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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

6 edition of Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England found in the catalog.

Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England

from Dickens to Eliot

by Carolyn Oulton

  • 155 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan in Houndmills, Hampshire, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Newman, John Henry, 1801-1890 -- Influence,
    • Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870 -- Religion,
    • Collins, Wilkie, 1824-1889 -- Religion,
    • Eliot, George, 1819-1880 -- Religion,
    • English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism,
    • Christianity and literature -- England -- History -- 19th century,
    • Religion and literature -- England -- History -- 19th century,
    • Christian fiction, English -- History and criticism,
    • Religion in literature

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementCarolyn W. de la L. Oulton.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR878.R5 O95 2002
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. cm.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3569802M
      ISBN 100333993373
      LC Control Number2002072349

      United Kingdom - United Kingdom - Early and mid-Victorian Britain: The implementation of the liberal, regulative state emerging after the Napoleonic Wars involved a number of new departures. The first of these concerned the new machinery of government, which, instead of relying on patronage and custom, involved an institutionalized bureaucracy. Summary. There is no official state religion in Utopia. People are allowed freedom of belief, with the consequence that there is a variety of religious sects or, as we should say, denominations.

      Books shelved as victorian-history: Inside the Victorian Home: A Portrait of Domestic Life in Victorian England by Judith Flanders, The Invention of Murd. Miss Clack (Drusilla) is a character, and part-narrator, in Wilkie Collins' novel The Moonstone. A poor relation of the Verinder family, Miss Clack is an ardent Evangelical, and has a habit of handing out improving tracts to strangers and family alike.

      Carolyn Oulton has written: 'Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England' -- subject(s): Christianity and literature, English Christian fiction, English fiction, History, History and. Professor Kate Flint explores the way Victorians bought, borrowed and read their books, and considers the impact of the popular literature of the period. Victorians were great readers of the novel, and the number of novels available for them to .


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Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England by Carolyn Oulton Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Literature and Religion in Mid-Victorian England: From Dickens to Eliot (): Oulton, C.: BooksCited by: 4. This book places Dickens and Wilkie Collins against such important figures as John Henry Newman and George Eliot in seeking to recover their response to the religious controversies of mid-nineteenth century England.

This book places Dickens and Wilkie Collins against such important figures as John Henry Newman and George Eliot in seeking to recover their response to the religious controversies of mid-nineteenth century England.

While much recent criticism has tended to overlook or dismiss their religious. Literature and Religion in Mid-Victorian England The Pope has just canonised three nineteenth-century missionaries, but no-one had seriously expected to see St Charles Dickens or St Wilkie Collins, who are the main focus of this book.

Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England: from Dickens to Eliot. [Carolyn Oulton] -- "This book places Dickens and Wilkie Collins against such important figures as John Henry Newman and George Eliot in their response to the religious crisis of mid-nineteenth century England.

Literature and religion in mid-Victorian England: from Dickens to Eliot Henry Newman and George Eliot in seeking to recover their response to the religious controversies of midth-century England.

While much criticism has tended to overlook or dismiss their religious pronouncements, this book foregrounds the religious aspect of their Author: C. Oulton. Cite this chapter as: Gibson W. () Religion in Mid-Victorian England. In: Church, State and Society, – British History in : William Gibson.

VICTORIAN LITERATURE AND THE VARIETY OF RELIGIOUS FORMS - Volume 46 Issue 2 - Mark Knight Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites.

> Charles Darwin, from a medallion by Alphonse Legros In the years which passed between and great events occupied public attention - the establishment of the Second Empire in France, the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, the Unification of Italy, the American Civil War, and the decisive contest between.

Literature and Religion. Religion can be thought of as a set of institutions, a set of ideas and beliefs, or a lived practice (including the rituals, behaviors, and day-to-day life of individuals and communities)—all of which have complex relations with each other, and all of which are affected by and in turn affect literature (not least in the interpretations of scriptures).

This is a well-written book by a well-known scholar of Victorian religion. The Introduction is valuable reading for any student of history, culture, or literature of the period. The book covers many aspects of life in the Victorian Church of England.

The scholar will appreciate both the notes and the bibliography which are both by: Others, such as the poet Alfred Tennyson, clung to their faith, ‘believing where we cannot prove’. But the 19th century was far from irreligious. As the old certainties crumbled, new faiths emerged, such as Spiritualism, established in England by the s, and Theosophy, which drew on Buddhism and Hinduism.

Buy This Book in Print summary Lake Methodism: Polite Literature and Popular Religion in England, –, reveals the traffic between Romanticism’s rhetorics of privilege and the most socially toxic religious forms of the eighteenth and nineteenth by: 3.

Victorian literature is literature, mainly written in English, during the reign of Queen Victoria (–) (the Victorian era).It was preceded by Romanticism and followed by the Edwardian era (–). While in the preceding Romantic period, poetry had been the conquerors, novels were the emperors of the Victorian period.

[clarification needed] Charles Dickens (– The book will appeal to scholars and students across disciplines such as art history, literature, history and cultural studies. Its original research, rigorous analysis and accessible style will make it essential reading for anyone interested in questions of representation and belief in mid-Victorian England.

Between science and religion: the reaction to scientific naturalism in late Victorian England, Young, R.M.

'Malthus and the Evolutionists: The Common Context of Biological & Social theory' in Darwin's Metaphor: Nature's Place in Victorian Culture.

Science and Religion (at ) Victorian Geology in the Victorian Web. Religion and science in the Victorian era Most Victorian Britons were Christian. The Anglican churches of England, Wales, and Ireland were the state churches (of which the monarch was the nominal head) and dominated the religious landscape (even though the majority of Welsh and Irish people were members of other churches).

This chapter locates religion at the heart of Victorian literary culture and explores the reciprocal relationship between literary and religious forms, texts, and aesthetics. After outlining the relationship between literature and religion in the period, the chapter reflects on how modern criticism reads this relationship, both historically and : Emma Mason.

This book examines the relationship between literature and religious conflict in seventeenth-century England, showing how literary texts grew out of and addressed the contemporary controversy over ceremonial worship. Examining the meaning and function of religion in seventeenth-century England, Achsah Guibbory shows that the conflicts over religious ceremony that were central.

About. Religion & Literature is a scholarly journal providing a forum for discussion of the relations between two crucial human concerns, the religious impulse and the literary forms of any era, place, or language. Current Issue, Volume (published Spring ).

Literature and Religion in Mid-Victorian England: from Dickens to Eliot, Carolyn W. de la L. Oulton, Palgrave, Macmillan: Reality's Dark Light - The Sensational Wilkie Collins, Maria K. Bachman and Don Richard Cox (eds.), University of Tennessee Press: Anti-Catholic sentiment was a major social, cultural, and political force in Victorian England, capable of arousing remarkable popular passion.

Hitherto, however, anti-Catholic feeling has been treated largely from the perspective of parliamentary politics or with reference to the propaganda of various London-based anti-Catholic religious organizations.The Victorians: Religion and Science.

sides in the debates of the first half of the century unacceptable; and, crucially, by or so, in the high noon of mid-Victorian liberalism, it was less dangerous, less sensational than it had been earlier in the century to renounce one’s faith and declare one’s agnosticism, as James Mill and.